Nazi Plunder is Still a Hot Topic in the Art World

The cover of Miller and Tatzkow' s book.
E. Randol Schoenberg (photo from Chapman University)
E. Randol Schoenberg
(Photo from Chapman University)

Southern California art and history enthusiasts will be treated to two exciting events. Discussions of stolen art, and the resulting stolen culture, usually revolve around World War II and the Nazi theft of countless priceless treasures, often from the homes of Jews. These events will be further explored on Tuesday, October 13, as Chapman University’s Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education hosts E. Randol Schoenberg’s presentation, “Stolen by the Nazis: Recovering ‘The Woman in Gold’ and Other Paintings,” as well as “Looted Art: Stealing Cultural Heritage,” a Chapman Faculty Panel Presentation and Discussion.

These events are free and open to the general public. For more information, visit the CU Events page here and here.

The cover of Miller and Tatzkow' s book.
The cover of Miller and Tatzkow’s book.

Can’t make it to the events? Check out Lost Lives, Lost Art: Jewish Collectors, Nazi Art Theft, and the Quest for Justice by Melissa Müller and Monika Tatzkow here.

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